Not just a keyboard

As DBK said, if it’s not a high-priced product where I can’t afford to lose the money, and it looked like it was revolutionary the way the TB is, I’d back them in a heartbeat. Even if I had to use something else in the meantime. I don’t normally back kickstarter projects because I have no firsthand knowledge of the people running them - I don’t know their determination to succeed or their commitment to quality.
I’ll take chances on products if they have unusual promise and if the development team is talented and driven. Great products are rare and the TB is a great product and that tells me as much as I need to know about the team.
Mark, if you set out to tackle another world-class problem like this, you know how to reach me.

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Nope. Not at all. It has nothing to do with someone’s intellect being better than someone elses. It has everything to do with some people simply being in a position to know more because they have the TB and have gone through much of the tech, with the TB with them, in phone calls.

That’s why I keep pointing out that even people in the business, who make the same complaints you do, changed their minds after they got in treg.

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Uniquenospaceshort - Nice😊

So can you bring some special iron-pumping to help us power through validation?

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Not if general release is being delayed to make the software architecture compatible with Skynet. Where did the idea for the TextBlade come from?

I’ve wondered where the basic concept came from too, because it is brilliant.

An early TextBlade prototype chip.

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When I visited the @waytools lab I saw the prototype TextBlade-1000. It is made of some sort of polyalloy that can morph to mimic whatever it is paired to. I was going to stick around to learn more but I saw a lot of police activity out the window — I asked how many cops some kid said “all of them” so I snuck out the back.

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[quote=“dpom, post:82, topic:5454, full:true”]
As DBK said, if it’s not a high-priced product where I can’t afford to lose the money, and it looked like it was revolutionary the way the TB is, I’d back them in a heartbeat. Even if I had to use something else in the meantime. I don’t normally back kickstarter projects because I have no firsthand knowledge of the people running them - I don’t know their determination to succeed or their commitment to quality.I’ll take chances on products if they have unusual promise and if the development team is talented and driven. Great products are rare and the TB is a great product and that tells me as much as I need to know about the team.Mark, if you set out to tackle another world-class problem like this, you know how to reach me.[/quote]

Exactly. Even if WayTools somehow fails to deliver, $99 is a fairly small investment in the what-could-be.

Besides, this will be a great story when the product does come out, because instead of fitting the typical story line of “raised money on kickstarter and burned through it all with nothing to show for it”, this will be the “raised money on kickstarter and burned through it all TEN TIMES OVER and took years longer to actually build the thing but somehow kept going and FINALLY DELIVERED”.

Well said Cameron. Although we never used any Kickstarter campaign, we did invest a lot more money than planned, based on the amazing positive feedback we got from users. Once we knew we had a winner, we doubled down on investment to refine its strengths.

Perseverance is a characteristic quality you see on most significant leaps forward in technology. It’s hard and expensive, but it really works to make big, successful changes for the mass market.

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Okay, but we placed orders based on the representations you made.

Which were — to be kind — wildly inaccurate.

Right so far?

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Look, different people have different skills and talents. There are a few skills and talents that WayTools could have really used on their team to manage their community interactions and communications much better, but that was pretty obvious three years ago, and as irritating as it may be, that’s baked into the WayTools “personality” now. It would literally ruin everything if they suddenly started communicating on a reasonable schedule with a high degree of transparency into the process of closing down the release and getting the product out the door. (I say this only partially tongue-in-cheek.)

And for $99, you got a front row seat to the whole show, and your kids will really enjoy and appreciate the keyboard when it comes out. Think of this (the eventual delivery of your order) as a part of your legacy that you will leave to your kids.

Really, don’t take this whole thing too seriously, because taking it too seriously is WayTools’ job. The WayTools team is obviously both insane and committed. They’ll get this thing done and out even if it kills them. Which some days they probably think it will …

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Honestly, this sounds a little like the parallel argument being conducted right now over Linus Torvalds decision to look into some anger management skills and the imposition of a long-needed Code of Conduct on the project.

“BUT YOU’RE GOING TO RUIN EVERYTHING IF YOU MAKE US STOP BEING ABUSIVE JERKS!”

Seriously, there’s literally no bad time to up your communications skills, especially when you’re hanging on to a lot of people’s money who — in all fairness — have been displaying great patience with these shenanigans.

Asking that people — at a minimum — keep their commitments about the updates they themselves promised is hardly a lot to be asking. It’s kind of co-dependent to be saying, “Well, they’ve gotten away with it for this long.”

Look, I just want the “not just a keyboard” I ordered, and I’m looking at the dozenth-or-so change in season on its “scheduled” delivery today. Which is also behind schedule. Believe me, I’d be much more happy to be able to be positive about things, but that also would actually require my getting my keyboard.

Trust me, if it turns out to have been worth the wait, I’ll happily apologize, but that’s becoming an increasingly high bar. I’m just along for the ride. No, don’t cancel my order for me, thanks.

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Mcfate - We certainly don’t seek any apology. Your delight when you get your TextBlade is our reward.

On the other hand, it’s generally true that in life it’s easier to avoid regret than to fix it.

Harsh rhetoric isn’t what produces what you seek. Everyone wins from civility.

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You had seriously better hope that I do not die before you ship this thing after the amount of pumping that’s being done as an explanation for six weeks somehow turning into over two hundred. And counting. With software forks on “release candidates”.

I’m not kidding around here. And while I may be impatient, you haven’t seen me be “uncivil” so far.

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Sorry, highly inappropriate probably, but this came to mind reading the above. Tales from the Crypt.
image

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Thinking more like Gandalf the White -

We expect Mcfate will live a long and healthy life, and write volumes on his TextBlade.

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I hope Mcfate lives a long and healthy life and gets to write volumes on his TB as well. The question is WHEN???

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I don’t even know when I’m going to know WHEN.

And regardless of anyone’s expectations, Destiny is not going to be issuing me any “gimmes” or “do-overs” for the days that have passed — over a thousand of them — waiting for a keyboard.

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